Week Eleven | Task: Atea Lens Paper

Part One: Atea refers to the corresponding ideas of encounters with people and places, whilst following the appropriate tikanga that applies to the certain meeting space (Maori Dictionary). Part Two: Inspired by Uta Barth, I wished to create a series that reflects Atea in an interesting and unique way. Using blur as an abstract technique, I wanted to…

Week Ten | Task: Creative Non Fiction

Part One: Growing up in South Auckland, literally at the Botanic Gardens was an amazing childhood. With dad as, a keen gardener (and mum now too) I instantly grew a love for the environment and when we moved to Oakura, Taranaki that love grew. Living by the sea, I instantly got into surfing and haven’t…

Week Nine | Task: Powhiri & Stereotypes

Part One:   untitled-1  – PDF version of Powhiri stages Part Two:   During the lecture, Whyte brought attention to the “radical political activist” Tama Iti, who is portrayed by the media as a savage terrorist (Wall 43). The stereotype that surrounds Maori as being “primitive natural athletes”, was used by the media to construct…

Week Eight | Task: Poverty & Timeline

Part One:  The idea of the deserving and the undeserving poor was a key concept mentioned throughout Gilbert’s lecture and Nisbet’s Untitled cartoon reflects this concept. This image depicts a Maori or Pasifika whanau who are taking extreme measures to get free food in order to have money to spend on unnecessary items such as, “booze, smokes…

Week Seven| Task: Dawn Raids

Part One: A key theme from the lecture was racism and how the Pink Panthers used positive activism to create social change. The Pink Panthers focused on supporting Pacific Islander’s rights through education in order to “raise their quality of life” (Reid). They organised events to benefit the community and stood up to the disgraceful actions of the…

Week Six | Task: Western Accounts & 20th Century Art/Design

Part One: Maori visual and material culture has been shaped by the colonisation of Europeans in Aotearoa. The dominance of the Crown in Aotearoa has led to Maori becoming inferior, therefore their art and culture has become scrutinised and excluded from “historical narratives” (Wheoki 7). The language barrier between Maori and European caused multiple problems,…

Week Five | Task: Summary

Part One: Chapter Nine in Tangata Whenua discusses the wars that occurred in New Zealand over the 1860’s and early 70’s between Maori and the British Crown. There are obvious differences between the Maori and English versions of the Treaty of Waitangi, so after the signing in 1840 tension grew and the Crown used force…

Week Four | Task: Nga Putanga o te tikanga & Toanga

Task One: Mana is one of the most highly valued principles in Maori culture and determines an individual’s social standing within the community (Mead 29). Ancestry plays a huge role in defining levels of mana, as those with chiefly whakapapa draw their mana from their ancestors in order to become influential leaders with a high status…

Glossary

237.131 Kupu List Atua– Ancestor, god, deity Ea-achieving revenge, closing of a sequence and the restoration of relationships Hapu– Kinship group/ sub-tribe/ sub-nation “He iwi tahi tatou”: James Busby’s greeting to the chiefs as they signed the treaty. Translates to, “We are all one people”. Imagined Communities: an imagined community is the way in which a particular nation…

Week Three | Task: Te Puawaitanga

  This carved door belonged to a semi-subterranean storage pit from Omaramutu, Opotiki and contextualises itself within the period Te Puawaitanga (The Flowering, 1500-1800 AD) in relation to New Zealand art history (Anderson 97), which can also be acknowledged as the Traditional Phase (Anderson 73). Due to the increase in population, there became “a growing demand…

Week Two | Task: Ancient Origins

    McIntyre Wilson’s Plenty of Change is an important example of Maori design, as it shows a traditional icon being reconstructed with a contemporary twist to convey different stories of our post-colonial histories (41). Hei Tiki is highly regarded as sacred objects that are worn around the neck as a symbol of kinship and…